Monday, March 29, 2010

" STORMING THE BARRICADE " - AN INSTRUCTIVE GAME AT THE DAVAO OPEN

I have just been given a copy of the Book " Storming the Barricade " by GM Larry Christiansen courtesy of Chris Yap of One Network Bank and I immediately fell in love with the book. The book is a must for attacking players like me (he.he ) as it provides for the many patterns and tactics on how to demolish a King's barricade.


The other day I was given a copy of my friend Nofre Reyes's 3rd round game at the 2010 Araw ng Davao Open and it was quite entertaining and similar to the attacking chess introduced by GM Christiansen in his book. Relax and enjoy..


[Site "Gaisano Ilustre, Davao City"]
[Date "2010.3.27"]
[Round "2nd "]
[White "Nofre Reyes"]
[Black " Harris Llido "]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteELO "2035"]
[BlackELO "?"]

Caro-Kann Defense
( Panov-Botvinnik Attack )

With comments by Caissa's father


1. e4 c6 2. Nf3 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 Nf6 5. d4 Nc6 6. Nc3


This is the starting position of the once- dreaded Panov-Botvinnik
Attack. This line was quite popular in the 1950's and almost caused
the Caro-Kann's demise until the Black side was able to find an
improvement.


Bg4 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qb3 Bxf3 9. gxf3 Nb6 10. d5!?



Best is 10. Be3 According to NM Eric Schiller, in his Book " Complete
Defense to King's pawn Openings ". We'll see why.

10... Ne5?

A bad move. Best is the strong centralizing move 10... Nd4! threatening
Nxb3 and Nc2+. If 11. Qd1 e5! 12.dxe6 Bc5! with a good game for Black.
Greenfeld vs. Shirov European Club Cup Final, 1996, 0-1 63 moves.

11. Bb5+ Nbd7 12. Be3!



White sacrifices the f3 pawn for quick development and the initiative..
The pawn is quite tempting not to be taken by black.

Nxf3+ 13. Ke2 Nfe5 14. f4 Ng4 15. Ne4!

Another good move creating mating threats at d6 after 15... Ne3
16.Qe3.

Ngf6 16. Ng5 a6 17. d6!



Storming the barricade and threatening 18. Qf7 mate..

18...e6
Only move.

18. Nxe6! fxe6 19. Qxe6+ Be7 20.Bb6!


Final position.

1-0

Replay the game below using the game replayer

4 comments:

  1. Date: 5/4/2010
    Opening: B10 Caro-Kann Defense

    1. e4 c6 2. Nf3 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 Nf6 5. d4 Nc6 6. Nc3

    The idea in this variation is for Black to counter the pressure on his d5 by eyeing d4 in return.It is not without risk for the c6 knight may find itself vulnerable to cxd5 or d5 ideas.

    6...Bg4 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qb3 Bxf3 9. gxf3

    Well, in principle it is better for Black to hold on to d5 knight with ...e6 and counter at d4. In reality however, you must be well versed with the forcing line that may follow. Keep in mind that by giving up the b7 pawn Black is risking big time since light squares weaken and White has the light-squared bishop.Black players need not worry though,for if he knows his theory he may reach a very tenable endgame. sample line : ( 9... e6 10. Qxb7 Nxd4 11. Bb5+ Nxb5 12. Qc6+ Ke7 13. Qxb5 Qd7 14. Nxd5+ Qxd5 15. Qxd5 exd5 16. Be3 Ke6 )


    9... Nb6 10. d5 Ne5 This move by Black is terrible.

    Better is ( 10... Nd4 11. Qd1 e5 12. dxe6ep fxe6 13. Be3 Bc5 with complicated play. Keep in mind that 14. b4?! Qf6! gives undue risks for White. and 14. Bg2 can be met by ...Nc4!? with counterplay for Black. I believe 11.Bb5+!? is promising. )

    11. Bb5+ Nbd7 12. Be3

    A very nice pawn sacrifice typical of my friend Denden's style

    Nxf3+ 13. Ke2 Ne5 14. f4 Ng4 15. Ne4

    A prophylactic move,made in anticipation of a possible exchange on e3.

    15... Nf6 16. Ng5

    After this move everything is pretty much forced in a bad position, stemming from bad opening play.

    16... a6 17. d6 e6 18. Nxe6 fxe6 19. Qxe6+ Be7 20. Bb6

    I think it is better for Denden to play 20. Rhg1 g6 then 21. Bb6 because the 21... Nd5 idea is rendered useless with 22. Qe5!. and in the long run the advantage of White is steadily increased.

    If 20... Nd5 21. dxe7 Nf4+ 22. Kf3 Nxe6 23. exd8/Q+ Rxd8 24. Bxd8 axb5 25. Ba5. Still White has the upperhand.

    Nice game Den! Typical of your attacking style.

    Marlon Torio
    Iba, Zambales

    ReplyDelete
  2. Mar, in round 6 of the said tournament my 15 year old opponent tried 9..e6 and I lost in a drawn position. thanks for your comments and analysis

    ReplyDelete
  3. Marlon, Thanks for visiting this blog and nice analysis too. Maybe you can share some of your annotated games with us for posting here. Just contact Denden.

    ReplyDelete